Samsung Galaxy S10: Explained

Another year, another Samsung Galaxy release. Celebrating 10 years of the Galaxy brand, the S10 represents the very best that Samsung has to offer. This year, the electronics giant has treated us to three new models with the S10, S10+, and S10e.

If you’re looking to find out all there is to know about Samsung’s latest flagship model, you’ve come to the right place. Here’s the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Samsung Galaxy S10 full details:

Samsung has gone one up from its tradition of delivering two new models each year. This year, there will be three flagship devices, being the S10, S10+, and S10e.

Below you may find a full spec breakdown of the three devices:

 

Category

Galaxy S10

Galaxy S10+

Galaxy S10e

Display

6.1-inch AMOLED

3040 x 1440 (19:9)

6.4-inch AMOLED

3040 x 1440 (19:9)

5.8-inch AMOLED 2280 x 1080

Processor

Qualcomm Snapdragon 855

Qualcomm Snapdragon 855

 

RAM

8GB

8GB/12GB

 

Front Camera 1

10MP Dual Pixel, f/1,9 autofocus

10MP Dual Pixel, f/1.9 autofocus

10MP Dual Pixel, F,1.9 autofocus

Front Camera 2

8MP, f/2.2 autofocus

 

Rear Camera 1

12MP Dual Pixel, f/1.5 - f/2.4 OIS

12MP Dual Pixel, f/1.5-2.4 OIS

12MP Dual Pixel, f/1.5-2.4 OIS

Rear Camera 2

16MP 123° Wide-angle, f/2.2 fixed focus

16MP 123° Wide-angle, f/2.2 fixed focus

16MP 123° Wide-angle, f/2.2 fixed focus

Rear Camera 3

12MP 45° telephoto, f/2.4 OIS

12MP 45° FOV, f/2.4 OIS

 

Battery

3400 mAh

4100 mAh

3100 mAh

Security

In-screen fingerprint sensor

In-screen fingerprint sensor

Capacitive Fingerprint sensor

Should you upgrade?

If you’re already a Samsung Galaxy owner then upgrading is a no brainer unless you own the Galaxy S8 or S9. At that point, there’s some thinking to do.

How does Samsung’s S10 stack up against its former flagship models? See a detailed breakdown of the Galaxy S8 and S9 below:

Category

Galaxy S8

Galaxy S9

Display

5.8-inch AMOLED

2960 x 1440 (18.5:9)

5.8-inch AMOLED 2960 x 1440 (18.5:9)

Processor

Qualcomm Snapdragon 835

Qualcomm Snapdragon 845

RAM

4GB

4GB

Front Camera

8PM, f/1.7 autofocus

8PM, f/1.7 autofocus

Rear Camera

12MP Dual Pixel, f/1.7 OIS

12MP Dual Pixel, f/1.5-2.4 OIS

Battery

3000 mAh

3000 mAh

Security

 

One-touch fingerprint sensor

Capacitive fingerprint sensor

 

As you can see, the Samsung Galaxy S9 didn’t offer S8 owners much reason – if any – to upgrade from its predecessor.

Aside from a slightly improved camera, there weren’t any major upgrades to entice S8 owners to upgrade. The device was targeted at existing S6 and S7 owners.

Compare the S10 to the previous two models though, and there’s a very obvious major leap forward. Samsung has spared no expense in celebrating 10 years of Galaxy.

For a Galaxy enthusiast, upgrading from an S8 or older is a no-brainer. For S9 owners, the upgrade may be a little too soon. Though, the S10 is so far ahead that it may be worth the difference.

At the time this article was written, a good-condition S9 sells for between $500 - $600 and the S9 Plus sells for between $600 - $700. A Samsung Galaxy S10 will set you back $1,349 brand new.

What are the major changes?

Natural progression in technology obviously plays into the hands of newly released electronics. As a result, the Samsung Galaxy S10 has leaped forward with its latest offering.

Right off the bat, the Samsung Galaxy 10 has received a more powerful and efficient processor than its predecessor. The difference may not be immediately noticeable in day to day use. Though, when you’re hitting your phone hard or as new apps become more demanding, you’ll appreciate the difference. Particularly if the S10 will be a long-term purchase.

There’s also the obvious jump to 8/12GB from 4GB.

If you’re a power user, the S10’s new batteries are music to your ears. The 3400 mAh S10 and the 4100 mAh S10 Plus batteries will easily get you through the day, especially with the more efficient new processor.

The last big change is the camera. The addition of an ultra-wide camera, image stabilisation for video and a secondary telephoto camera on the back make for a huge improvement in image quality. 

Why shouldn’t you buy an S10?

There’s only one major reason you shouldn’t buy an S10, and that same reason goes for any smart phone.

As the saying goes, beauty is pain. The Samsung Galaxy S10 is no exception.

Following a full review of the device in their Samsung Galaxy Teardown, iFixit scored the Samsung Galaxy S10 and S10e with only a 3/10 for repairability. That’s really low!

They did praise that the S10, however, for only needing one standard Philips screw driver for complete access to the phone.

To conclude, if you’re worried about your Samsung breaking, then it’s time to head back to that old Nokia 3310 collecting dust in the drawer.

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